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2022 Ch Haut Brion 1er Grand Cru Classé Pessac-Léognan - 6x75cl
  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Drinking 2029 - 2060
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur

2022 - Ch Haut Brion 1er Grand Cru Classé Pessac-Léognan - 6x75cl

  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Drinking 2029 - 2060
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur
Case price: £3,090.00 In Bond
Please note: These wines are lying abroad until shipping and can only be purchased In Bond. If you are an existing Private Reserves customer, the wine will be automatically transferred on arrival. Otherwise, you will be contacted on arrival in the UK to arrange delivery, In Bond storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse.
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Pricing

  • IN BOND prices exclude UK Duty and VAT. Wines can be purchased In Bond for storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse, or for export to non-EU countries. Duty and VAT must be paid before delivery can take place.

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Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.
  • Neal Martin, April 2023, Score: 96-98

    The 2022 Haut-Brion, matured in 70% new oak, represents the 99th vintage under three generations of the Delmas family (see my recently published book for a remarkable photo of the first). It has slightly darker fruit than the La Mission at the moment. Incense and potpourri infuse the black plum and bilberry. There's a touch of brine in the background. It manifests more and more complexity as it opens in the glass. The palate is medium-bodied and is blessed with unerring symmetry. It has a bewitching granular texture, complex and more focused than recent vintages, and comes across as almost pixelated on the finish. Quintessential Haut-Brion. Magnificent, but not necessarily the best wine that Delmas oversaw in this vintage. Drink 2030-2065

  • Wine Advocate, April 2023, Score: 95-97

    The 2022 Haut-Brion shows considerable promise, revealing aromas of dark berries and plums mingled with notions of pencil lead, licorice, tobacco leaf, spices and incense. Full-bodied, broad and seamless, it's rich and muscular, with a deep, layered core of fruit framed by an ample endowment of tannin. This blend of 53.6% Merlot, 35.4% Cabernet Sauvignon and 11% Cabernet Franc, the result is a lip-smacking exemplification of controlled power. Analytically, the 2022 possesses a similar level of tannins to the 2010, and a similar pH to the 2009, yet it is more suave and polished than the 2010 at the same stage, and seemingly more dynamic than the 2009.

  • Decanter, April 2023, Score: 96

    Milk chocolate and blackcurrants on the nose, fragrant ripe black cherries and some floral notes. Sleek, supple, suave, really confident and shiny. This keeps the tension more than La Mission at this point with a vein of freshness and intensity. It’s not out to charm but it’s out to impress. Excellent construction, clean depth and power, tense, strict and streamlined, a touch of creaminess and saltiness. You get waves of flavour intensity with ripe, concentrated fruit, soft acidity and a clean stone freshness. Tannins fill the mouth with edges of both minerality and toasted spices. Calm and controlled, impressive with focus. 3.8pH. A yield of 35hl/ha.

  • Antonio Galloni, April 2023, Score: 97-99

    The 2022 Haut-Brion comes across as a bit restrained, given the natural opulence of the year and the other wines in the Clarence Dillon portfolio. Deep and wonderfully layered, the 2022 possesses remarkable depth but also a bit less of the explosive energy that is such a Haut-Brion signature. I suspect that will come in time, as the 2022 starts to show quite a bit better with a little aeration. Violet, gravel, incense, leather, tobacco and scorched earth linger. Superb. Drink 2025-2062.

  • Goedhuis, April 2023, Score: 98-100

    Quite simply a wine of joyous sophistication. It has a fragrance of spring flowers, red berries, bright cherry and olallieberry. The initial sensation of lacelike texture immediately excites and unfurls into a symphony of flavours and nuances, refined and silky withs a velvet-like volume. The wine keeps evolving in the palate, showing a perfect composition between fruit, richness, weight, and energy. Hedonistic and yet sophisticated, this is so classy and statuesque on the finish. There is no doubting this superb wine’s First Growth credentials.

  • James Suckling, April 2023, Score: 98-99

    Currants and cedar with sandalwood and peaches. Fascinating aromas. Violets. Full-bodied with a crunchy and electric palate of primary fruit, with hints of tangerines and citrus. Great finish with structure and polish. 53.6% merlot, 35.4% cabernet sauvignon and 11% cabernet franc. Interesting to have such high merlot in the blend.

  • Jancis Robinson, April 2023, Score: 18

    Hallmark Haut-Brion opulence of texture. Powerful tannic frame behind. Lovely depth of fruit. Dark- and red-fruit notes with a touch of liquorice as it opens. Complex, powerful and persistent with enough freshness to provide balance. (James Lawther MW) Drink 2034 – 2055

  • Jane Anson, April 2023, Score: 96

    Stately, inky colour, this is impressively vivid and energetic despite the intensity of the construction. Fresh fig character, black chocoate, cinnammon, turmeric, creamy bilberry and blackberry fruits, with clove and sandalwood spice, and a slow build of texture and contrast from the slate tannins as they draw out the flavours. Harvest August 29-19 September. 3.9ph. Less Cabernet Sauvignon than usual due to tiny yields,

  • Jeb Dunnuck, April 2023, Score: 96-98

    Slightly better than its sibling La Mission Haut-Brion, the 2022 Château Haut-Brion has a full-bodied, concentrated, structured style that's going to demand bottle age. Cassis, graphite, scorched earth, and tobacco are just some of its nuances aromatically, and it shows the ripe, powerful style of the vintage. There are lots of tannins here, especially on the finish, and it's going to need 7-8 years in the cellar.

  • Matthew Jukes, April 2023, Score: 19+

    This was the second earliest harvest ever at Haut-Brion There was minimal frost at Haut-Brion in 2022. The lower-than-normal yields resulted from the drought, but despite the high temperatures, the vines were resplendent with green leaves and bursting with health throughout the season. They found water deep below the surface. Of course, Haut-Brion had its viti-team on standby, just in case, throughout the summer, poised to rush out and administer assistance to any precious vines in need, but in the end, they sat back and barely touched the vines. In contrast to La Mission, Haut-Brion leads with a Merlot fanfare. While the statistics above do not lie, this wine does not have a plump, juicy Merlot-driven character. In fact, you could be forgiven for thinking it was Cab-dominant, given the strictness and firmness of the palate. Stunning, dry, teasingly closed and yet knowingly flirty, there are glimpses of beautifully tender fruit among the hard edges, keeping you on the edge of your seat. It also possesses some of the most refined tannins I have seen in this vintage, but because the volume of flavour is so potent, the delivery of tannins appears to be gentle and civilised. This will be an incredible wine when it loses its tension in a couple of decades, so please do not open a bottle before 2040.

Producer

Château Haut-Brion

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan ...Read more

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan in Graves, the estate is the only classified growth located outside the Médoc. Château Haut Brion has the most Merlot and the most Cabernet Franc of any of the First Growths and the second wine is Le Clarence de Haut-Brion, known as Ch Bahans Haut Brion prior to 2007.Read less

Region

Pessac-Léognan

Stretching from the rather unglamorous southern suburbs of Bordeaux, for 50 km along the left bank of the river Garonne, lies Graves. Named for its gravelly soil, a relic of Ice Age glaciers, this is the birthplace of claret, despatched from the Middle Ages onwards from the nearby quayside to England in vast quantities. It can feel as though Bordeaux is just about red wines, but some sensational white wines are produced in this area from a blend of sauvignon blanc, Semillon and, occasionally, muscadelle grapes, often fermented and aged in barrel. In particular, Domaine de Chevalier is renowned for its superbly complex whites, which continue to develop in bottle over decades. A premium appellation, Pessac-Leognan, was created in 1987 for the most prestigious terroirs within Graves. These are soils with exceptional drainage, made up of gravel terraces built up in layers over many millennia, and consequently thrive in mediocre vintages but are less likely to perform well in hotter years. These wines were appraised and graded in their own classification system in 1953 and updated in 1959, but, like the 1855 classification system, this should be regarded with caution and the wines must absolutely be assessed on their own current merits.